Saturday, May 25, 2013

247-Unknown U.S. Soldier


I painted this years ago, probably one of my first flags.
(in the 90's)   I was tempted to work on it but decided I wouldn't. I
Would just leave it like I did it back then. Thank you to all the
families who waited at home, praying for news from their special
'soldier', and thank you to all the veterans that served our wonderful
country to keep us free,  I took photos of a cemetery in Mississippi
 that was nothing but rows of white head stones. This one really touched me.

7 comments:

CrimsonLeaves said...

I do so respect and admire all of our military veterans. This is a beautiful memorial, Suzy.

Katherine Thomas said...

This is a very touching piece Suzy. I can feel the emotional impact that you must have felt in creating it. Between artist and viewer there should be a mutual creating of the piece, and your piece invites that to happen. I love flag art too. We're lucky to have the stars and stripes on our flag, I think! Well done!

Suzy Pal Powell said...

thank you Katherine.

Siggi in Downeast Maine said...

Very powerful...it was amazing that I clicked on this as I was watching Good Morning America's piece on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier... I was there when I was 12 and again at 20 and when I saw your painting and your description, I am happy you left it as is...as one person told me.. "you can paint another how you want to change this one"... and your words are very powerful.
Thank you,
Peace and love,
Siggi

Siggi in Downeast Maine said...

PS...it was the recorded Today show from 5/25 that I was watching...and I watched it again, with your thoughts in front of me... how hard it must be to not ever know...and how nice it must be to know someone cares.

Suzy Pal Powell said...

Thank you Crimson! I appreciate it.

Suzy Pal Powell said...

Siggi, Thank you so much for taking the time to make a comment on my blog. I just can not even begin to imagine how the mothers, dads, wives, brothers, sisters, etc. feel when they never heard from their loved one again. How do they deal with it? we can not forget. ever. what our men and women have been through. Ken had an uncle who parachuted and ended up in trees and was shot there. He had another uncle who was in the battle of Normandy and was wounded, but survived. The stories just go on. I counted 16 family members in mine and Kens families who served, and I don't think that is not all of them.